Book Review, NNFD

National Non Fiction Day Book Review: The Usborne Art Sticker Book

Today is National Non Fiction Day in the Uk!

National Non Fiction Day has been organised by the Federation of Children’s Book Groups in partnership with Scholastic Children’s Books. There’s a fantastic website to look at with some great book recommendations and a massive amount of free downloadable fun stuff for children of all ages and abilities, covering a wide range of topics from History, Crafts, Animals and much more. The website states ‘It aims to celebrate all that is brilliant about non fiction and show that it’s not just fiction that can be read and enjoyed for pleasure.’ Definitely worth a look! You can also find out more at NNFD’s Facebook Page and by following on twitter @AllNonFic

To Celebrate I have reviews of some Children’s Non Fiction my Daughter and I have been looking at recently.

The Usborne Art Sticker Book


Usborne are fantastic at Non fiction for children and the reason for this is that they understand what will capture a child’s imagination and interest. There isn’t a child anywhere who doesn’t love stickers and by using them in lots of their books they make sure that children have fun while learning. I wasn’t sure my daughter would like this book when it first arrived, covering serious works of art from the National Gallery, but by making it interactive and involving with the child filling in the frames with stickers of famous paintings she really liked it, and so did I.



Beside each painting there’s also a little passage of information, very much targeted at it’s audience which makes the paintings all the more interesting and fun. Some tell an interesting story about the painting, such as Henri Rousseau’s painting of a tiger ready to pounce on some explorers who are not in the picture, while others highlight a small detail that may otherwise have been missed. I liked how this allowed my daughter to see there was a story behind the paintings and she enjoyed looking for the small little details pointed out in the text. With it’s fun, easy style  the pictures are brought to life for young children and will encourage them to really look, think about and appreciate what they are seeing. There’s a whole page dedicated to pictures with hidden meanings which I also found fascinating. 


There’s also a history lesson contained in this book as many of the stickers are devoted to portraits and people. My daughter particularly enjoyed the Children’s Portrait page and was intrigued by the clothing, especially the boy’s who she thought were girls. Through one picture we were able to talk about how children today are very lucky and that life was much harder for Children in the past and also that there were no cameras..you had to be painted instead!


I myself know very little about art and it’s a long time since I visited the National Gallery.  I recognised many of the famous artists, such as Van Gough  and as an adult had my interest piqued by this book. I’d certainly plan a visit with my daughter to the Gallery next year when we plan on visiting London and I think she’d enjoy taking the book with her and seeing these pictures ‘live’, infact when we learned that the painting of WhistleJacket the Racehorse is almost the same size as a racehorse she asked if she could see it. I was very surprised at how much my daughter took away from this book and it proves how well Usborne know their audience. I’d recommend this book as something very different and interesting to children aged 6-10 years old.

Thanks to Usborne for sending us this book for review.


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