Six In Six – A Look Back At Some Of My Top Books Of 2017 So Far…

6 I saw this over at Cleopatra Loves Books, and thought it was a great idea to look back at books read so far in 2017. Hosted by Jo’s Book Journey, the idea is sharing 6 books, in 6 categories from the first half of the year. So here’s my choices:

6 Books I Have Enjoyed The Most 

 

 

6 Psychological Thrillers I Have Read & Enjoyed 

 

 

6 New To Me Authors 

 

 

6 Covers I’ve Loved

 

 

6 Books Which Took Me To The Past 

 

 

Six Books I Own & Can’t Believe I Haven’t Managed To Read Yet 

 

Looking Back at February and Forward to March 2017

I love saying goodbye to February. It hasn’t been a bad Month, in fact book wise it has been great. I’ve read some fantastic books this month, with the bonus on having the half term break to spend doing lots and lots of reading. But March is when you can feel change is in the air. The spring flowers are well on their way to pushing their way up in the world, the nights are getting lighter. I really struggle with dark nights, so when March comes round, I feel like I’m waking up and find energy that had disappeared over the dark winter months.  
At Work This morning…lovely!
Book of The Month
I read nine books in February…and enjoyed them all. However, my book of the month was Sealskin by Su Bristow
  
Coming Up In March  
Here’s some of the books I’m looking forward to reading and reviewing in March  

I’ve read The last Act of Hattie Hoffman since taking this photo…watch out for a review coming soon. 
Are any of these on your list? What are you looking forward to reading in March? 



Sunday Wrap Up – 19th February 2016

 
Woohoo…on Friday I finished work for half term, and although I really love my job, the last few weeks have been intense for various reasons. I was also pretty ill over the Christmas holidays so didn’t feel I’d had a proper wind down before going back in January. So for the next week my plans are to read, sort some stuff around the house, read, catch up with some TV and read some more. I’ve also started doing a bit of blog organising…making some small tweaks to the template, adding in links and general tidying. I need to work out the best way to organise my review A-Z. There’s so many reviews here now, I don’t think the long list works. I’m thinking of maybe separating by genre also…what do you think? Last night I also began jotting in ideas, plans and schedules in my diary. I’m going to keep this organised this time. Promise!  
Last Week On The Blog 

I reviewed these two fantastic but very different books (you can read my reviews by clicking the images) 

New Books This Week 

I got some fantastic book post this week. 
(clicking on the titles will take you to Goodreads for a summery)

 
Currently Reading  



Hope you all have a wonderful week 

I’m linking this post to the Caffeinated Book reviewers Sunday Post Meme


Book Review: Sealskin by Su Bristow

Donald is a young fisherman, eking out a lonely living on the west coast of Scotland. One night he witnesses something miraculous, and makes a terrible mistake. His action changes lives—not only his own, but those of his family and the entire tightly knit community in which they live. Can he ever atone for the wrong he has done, and can love grow when its foundation is violence? Based on the legend of the selkies—seals who can transform into people—evokes the harsh beauty of the landscape, the resilience of its people, both human and animal, and the triumph of hope over fear and prejudice. With exquisite grace, Su Bristow transports us to a different world, subtly and beautifully exploring what it means to be an outsider, and our innate capacity for forgiveness and acceptance. Rich with myth and magic, Sealskin is, nonetheless, a very human story, as relevant to our world as to the timeless place in which it is set. ( From Goodreads.com)  

Published 15th February 2017 by Orenda Books (UK)

I knew, as soon as I read the synopsis for Sealskin, that this was going to be my kind of book. I love re-tellings of old legends and myths and a hint of magic realism. Having read some wonderful reviews and followed the author’s fascinatingly interesting blog tour, I couldn’t wait to read it for myself.   

Sealskin is set on a Scottish Island in a small fishing village and Su Bristow captures the essence of the rugged landscape and sea beautifully – harsh, raw and at times violent combined with a breathtaking beauty, purity and etherealness. And it’s those same qualities which transcend into this exquisite story and the lives of its characters. 

The story begins with Donald, a lonely and often ostracised member of this close knit community, who while out fishing late at night witnesses something magical, something only a few humans have ever seen. His reaction is shocking and uncomfortable, a violent act in contrast the purity of the magic he has just seen. It was difficult here to accept Donald’s actions, and I worried that my distaste and anger at what Donald does was so great, I wouldn’t be able to enjoy the rest of the book. 

But this where Su Bristow’s skill as a master story teller shines. Sealskin is a fairytale-not the watered down, happy ever after ones we’re accustomed to nowadays, but of the traditional variety. Dark themes, flawed characters, naivety and wisdom mixing together with a message of hope, learning and overcoming both real and personal demons. I could imagine this story being told by candlelight hundreds of years ago, while remaining as enchanting and relevant to a modern reader.  

I loved the character of Mairhi. She is written with such care that the feelings of calmness and healing she shares with those in the book seep from the page. She doesn’t speak, but the lyricism of her aura and eyes expressing her needs and feelings is written so evocatively, I could feel and imagine it myself. Indeed, Su Bristow’s prose throughout, from her depictions of characters to descriptions of the stunning scenery and nature, are so mesmerising and vivid, that I truly became lost in the story. While reading, my own surroundings blurred away and I had a feeling of coming out of a dream when looking up from the pages, needing a few seconds to anchor myself back in my own world.  

I went into Sealskin hoping that I would love it, and I did. Every word of it. For me, reading Sealskin was reminiscent of my experience of reading The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern or The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey. There aren’t many books I can think of that have had this all encompassing effect on me while transporting me to another world, which stays with me so vividly for years to come, but I’m adding Sealskin to that list.