#BlogBlitz #BookReview – Another Mother by Amanda James

Adopted at birth, for years Lu has secretly dreamt of finding her birth mother but childhood bullying has left her with a lack of confidence. When a tragic accident changes her life forever it sets her on a mission to get in contact with her birth mother and find out the reasons behind her adoption.

When she tracks down her mother in Cornwall there is an emotional reunion and the pair begin to form a relationship.

But is everything as wonderful as it appears or has Lu walked into a nightmare? 

Published 10th April 2018 by Bloodhound Books 

~ Review ~ 

When I started Another Mother, I was hoping I’d be gripped. I LOVED the premise, it just really appealed to me. And right from the very first page I was drawn in, immediately feeling at ease with Amanda Jennings writing, which flows beautifully.

Another Mother had a different kind of vibe to what I’d been expecting, but in a very good way. At times I almost forgot this was a thriller, which was nice because I wasn’t waiting expectantly for a twist and trying to second guess the plot.  I think it was down to the emotional investment that the author managed to convey with main character Lu. I connected with her immediately, not just because of the traumatic experience of loosing her adoptive mother and the uncertainty of meeting her birth mother, but because she was written so completely. A whole picture felt like it was created right from the start – her frustration in a dead end job, her lack of confidence and loneliness. I really cared about what happened to Lu.

I loved the setting of Cornwall too, and it fitted birth mother, Melyn’s story brilliantly. I loved how the there was a subtle undertone of atmosphere and sinister tension. It trickles into the narrative, and leaves the reader unnerved as they know something isn’t right but don’t know quite what or why.

Another Mother might be different and less in your face than other thrillers, but don’t be fooled – at its heart that’s what it is. Amanda James’s skill is in lulling the reader into a comfortable, steady pace and connecting her readers with her characters. I loved the fact that I was able to just read this book without waiting for the twists to jump out at me, appreciating even more when the book took a decidedly darker turn and secrets are revealed. This is effortless to read, perfect for the upcoming holiday season and is a book I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend to fans of  psychological thrillers, domestic noir and women’s fiction as it really does have a broad appeal.

)I read an advance ebook courtesy of the publisher)

 

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#BookReview – Our House by Louise Candlish (@TeamBatc @Louise_Candlish)

On a bright January morning in the London suburbs, a family moves into the house they’ve just bought in Trinity Avenue. 
Nothing strange about that. Except it is your house. And you didn’t sell it. 

When Fiona Lawson comes home to find strangers moving into her house, she’s sure there’s been a mistake. She and her estranged husband, Bram, have a modern co-parenting arrangement: bird’s nest custody, where each parent spends a few nights a week with their two sons at the prized family home to maintain stability for their children. But the system built to protect their family ends up putting them in terrible jeopardy. In a domino effect of crimes and misdemeanors, the nest comes tumbling down.

Now Bram has disappeared and so have Fiona’s children. As events spiral well beyond her control, Fiona will discover just how many lies her husband was weaving and how little they truly knew each other. But Bram’s not the only one with things to hide, and some secrets are best kept to oneself, safe as houses. 

Published 5th April 2018 by Simon and Schuster (UK)

~ Review ~

Imagine coming home to find strangers moving into your home? All your furniture has gone and they insist they now own it. Imagine then finding out that maybe this isn’t some kind of misunderstanding and your husband may well be behind it. That’s what happens to Fiona, when after a couple of days away she arrives back at her beloved house to find the life she knew entirely turned upside down.

I mean, how’s that for a hook? Within a couple of pages Louise Candlish sets the scene of a domestic nightmare and piques the intrigue of the reader. There was little doubt I was going to devour this book. I had to know what the hell was going on! Through Fiona’s podcasts and Bram’s desperate and tortured word documents the full horror is revealed.

What’s so fascinating about this book is that it’s both far fetched and believable in equal measures. On one hand, how the hell can a house be sold from beneath you? Yet, as we are taken deeper into the story and the full extent of the situation is revealed, it becomes more and more plausible.

Fiona and Bram’s marriage is crumbling after Fiona discovers her husband has cheated again. In a grown up attempt to maintain the lifestyle and beloved home of their children, Fiona suggests the completely modern approach of ‘birds nest’ parenting, where the children will remain where they are and it’ll be the parents who move in and out for their allocated contact time. It’s one of those concepts that sound great in theory right? But you can see the disaster waiting to happen right from the start, almost like watching through your fingers.

The problems begins when Bram – impulsive, deceitful and weak, gets a speeding ticket. What begins as a slight misdemeanor turns into a snowball of lies, tragedy, panic, manipulation and blackmail. I thought Louise Candlish captured the runaway-train-out-of-control effect fantastically, as Bram’s life literally spirals and he finds himself deeper and deeper in a situation he can’t get out of. I wanted to scream at him STOP!! I also thought Fiona’s character contrasted brilliantly against him, coming across as calm and capable, completely reasonable yet unable to see what was happening around her.

Our House really is a story of one lie leading to another and events which spiral out of control. It’s a roller-coaster at times, fueled with adrenaline and increasingly frenzied panic,  an intensifying sense of foreboding and an ending to leave you gasping in horror.  This is the very best kind of domestic noir – where the reader feels like an outsider looking in, can see the cracks and sense the impending doom but just doesn’t know how it will all unravel. Reading it to find out was an absolute joy of speeding pages and held breaths. I was gripped throughout and just couldn’t tear myself away.

(I read an advance e-copy courtesy of the publisher and Netgalley)

#BlogTour #BookReview – Lying To You by Amanda Reynolds (@amandareynoldsj @wildfirebks)

lying to youFollowing on from her eBook bestseller Close To Me, Amanda Reynolds is back with Lying To You, another gripping psychological drama. Perfect for fans of The Husband’s Secret and I Let You Go.

You’d know if you were lying to yourself, wouldn’t you?

When Jess Tidy was Mark Winter’s student, she made an accusation that ultimately saw him sentenced to three years in prison. A jury found him guilty, but he always maintained his innocence. Now, Jess’s mother’s death has brought her back to the village where she grew up, and where Mark still lives with his wife. And the truth about that night ten years ago which nearly destroyed them both is finally going to come out.

A gripping drama with dark twists and turns, perfect for fans of Liane Moriarty and the BBC series Doctor Foster. 

Published 1st April 2018 (Ebook) and 26th July 2018 (PB) by Wildfire Books (UK)

 

Warning! Make sure you have a clear few hours when you begin this book. 

That’s how I started my review of Amanda Reynolds’ debut novel, Close To Me, last year. And after reading her second novel, Lying To You, I can firmly say ….

Amanda Reynolds has done it again!!! 

Seriously, Amanda’s writing is so thoroughly addictive and compelling, the pages just turn themselves, meaning huge chunks of book just disappear without you even realising. Just as before, once I started Lying To You I didn’t put it down until I’d devoured the whole book.

Lying To You tells the story of Jess, as she gets a phone call from her brother to say their alcoholic mother has died. yet Jess is reluctant to go back home, wary of dredging up a past she is desperate to put behind her. In alternating chapters we also hear Karen’s story, as she struggles to deal with Jess’s return and resentment at the girl she blames for ruining her family’s life a decade ago with one devastating accusation.

I absolutely adore how Amanda Reynolds writes such convincingly flawed characters, drawing feelings of both empathy and mistrust. She isn’t afraid to show the dark side of her characters and writes emotions such as resentment, frustration, manipulation and fragility convincingly. There’s a theme to her female characters of loss of identity, grief at a loss of self and strength in wanting to regain control that I think is very relatable.

The story covers a shocking and traumatic topic of a teacher/student relationship and explores boundaries, trust and abuse of power in a realistic and sympathetic way. I was wary, to be honest, that this might not be the case, and I’m glad the author wrote the novel the way she did, once again showing her understanding and compassion for the complexities of relationships and manipulation. She doesn’t rely on shocking twists but explores the dark side of marriage, family and trauma respectfully and convincingly.

Amanda Reynolds has firmly cemented herself on my list of must read authors, her second novel being just as, if not more, engrossing, compelling and thought provoking as her first. There’s something so accessible and readable about her writing, which just  flows, making it effortless to read and page turning in the extreme. I barely noticed the time passing as I read Lying To You. I’d recommend this book to anyone who is a fan of dark domestic drama, and personally I can’t wait to read more from Amanda Reynolds myself.

(I read an advance proof courtesy of the Amazon Vine program)

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